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TakeYearsoffYourSmilebyTreatingAge-RelatedDentalProblems

You may be able to slow the aging process with healthy habits but you can’t stop it. Every part of your body will change, including your teeth and gums. And even with great dental hygiene and care, there are at least two aging outcomes you may not be able to avoid: discoloration and tooth wear.

Fortunately though, we have ways to counteract these effects and help you enjoy a much younger-looking smile. These techniques range in complexity and cost, but when tailored to your individual situation they can make a world of difference and restore your confidence in your smile.

Brightening teeth that have yellowed with age can be as simple as undergoing teeth whitening. The bleaching solution in this procedure (performed in the office or at home with a prescribed kit) can minimize enamel staining built up over the years. It can even be performed with some control over the level of desired brightness. Although whitening isn’t permanent, with proper care and regular touch-ups you can keep your youthful, dazzling smile for some time.

Tooth whitening, however, may not be enough in some cases of discoloration. If so, you can gain a bright new smile with porcelain veneers or crowns. A veneer is a thin layer of tooth-colored material bonded to the front of a tooth; a porcelain crown completely covers a tooth and is usually cemented onto it.

Normal tooth wearing can also affect the appearance of older teeth, making them look shorter and with less rounded edges than younger teeth. Veneers and crowns can be utilized for this problem too, as well as enamel shaping with a dental drill to minimize those sharp edges and project a softer, younger appearance. In extreme cases, surgically reshaping the gums can give teeth a longer and a more natural look.

These are just a few of the ways we can address these two aging problems, as well as others like receding gums. Depending on your situation, it’s quite possible we can help you take years off your smile.

If you would like more information on cosmetic answers to aging teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Bohle Family Dentistry
May 17, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
DentalMagicTransformsSmiles

Magician Michel Grandinetti can levitate a 500-pound motorcycle, melt into a 7-foot-tall wall of solid steel, and make borrowed rings vanish and reappear baked inside bread. Yet the master illusionist admits to being in awe of the magic that dentists perform when it comes to transforming smiles. In fact, he told an interviewer that it’s “way more important magic than walking through a steel wall because you’re affecting people’s health… people’s confidence, and you’re really allowing people to… feel good about themselves.”

Michael speaks from experience. As a teenager, his own smile was enhanced through orthodontic treatment. Considering the career path he chose for himself — performing for multitudes both live and on TV — he calls wearing an orthodontic device (braces) to align his crooked teeth “life-changing.” He relies on his welcoming, slightly mischievous smile to welcome audiences and make the initial human connection.

A beautiful smile is definitely an asset regardless of whether you’re performing for thousands, passing another individual on a sidewalk or even, research suggests, interviewing for a job. Like Michael, however, some of us need a little help creating ours. If something about your teeth or gums is making you self-conscious and preventing you from smiling as broadly as you could be, we have plenty of solutions up our sleeve. Some of the most popular include:

  • Tooth Whitening. Professional whitening in the dental office achieves faster results than doing it yourself at home, but either approach can noticeably brighten your smile.
  • Bonding. A tooth-colored composite resin can be bonded to a tooth to replace missing tooth structure, such a chip.
  • Veneers. This is a hard, thin shell of tooth-colored material bonded to the front surface of a tooth to change its color, shape, size and/or length; mask dental imperfections like stains, cracks, or chips, and compensating for excessive gum tissue.
  • Crowns. Sometimes too much of a tooth is lost due to decay or trauma to support a veneer. Instead, capping it with a natural-looking porcelain crown can achieve the same types of improvements. A crown covers the entire tooth replacing more of its natural structure than a veneer does.

If you would like more information about ways in which you can transform your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about the techniques mentioned above by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Teeth Whitening,” “Repairing Chipped Teeth,” and “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By Dr. Charels Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
December 29, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
JasonDerulosIdealMatch

When the multi-platinum recording artist, songwriter and TV personality Jason Derulo was recently asked about his ideal woman, his answer covered a remarkably broad spectrum. "There’s no specific thing," he said, "so I think it’s unfair to say what my ‘type’ is." But it turns out that there is one thing the So You Think You Can Dance judge considers essential: A beautiful smile.

"I’m not into messy teeth," Derulo said. "If the grill has spaces and different colors, it’s not my vibe."

As it turns out, he may be on to something: A number of surveys have indicated that a bright, healthy smile is often the first thing people notice when meeting someone new. Yet many are reluctant to open up that big grin because they aren’t satisfied with the way their teeth look. If you’re one of them, consider this: Modern cosmetic dentistry offers a variety of ways to improve your smile — and it may be easier and more affordable than you think.

For example, if your smile isn’t as bright as you would like it to be, teeth whitening is an effective and economical way to lighten it up. If you opt for in-office treatments, you can expect a lightening effect of up to 10 shades in a single one-hour treatment! Or, you can achieve the same effect in a week or two with a take-home kit we can custom-make for you. Either way, you’ll be safe and comfortable being treated under the supervision of a dental professional — and the results can be expected to last for up to two years, or perhaps more.

If your teeth have minor spacing irregularities, small chips or cracks, it may be possible to repair them in a single office visit via cosmetic bonding. In this process, a liquid composite resin is applied to the teeth and cured (hardened) with a special light. This high-tech material, which comes in colors to match your teeth, can be built up in layers and shaped with dental instruments to create a pleasing, natural effect.

If your smile needs more than just a touch-up, dental veneers may be the answer. These wafer-thin coverings, placed right on top of your natural teeth, can be made in a variety of shapes and colors — from a natural pearly luster to a brilliant "Hollywood white." Custom-made veneers typically involve the removal of a few millimeters of tooth enamel, making them a permanent — and irreversible — treatment. However, by making teeth look more even, closing up spaces and providing dazzling whiteness, veneers just might give you the smile you’ve always wanted.

If you would like more information about cosmetic dental treatments, please call our office to arrange a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry — A Time for Change.”

By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
October 06, 2015
Category: Oral Health

I ran across this article on Fox News by Lauren Oster and thought it would be a good one to pass along.  See the original article here.  You may or may not have heard of some things on this list but put together all in one place is a good idea.  I was guilty of the first one, multitasking.  You will end up with a cleaner mouth if you concentrate on what you are doing instead of planning your day.

14 mistakes you are making with your teeth

 

 

 

 

Taking care of your pearly whites isn't rocket science, but it's easy to slip into habits that could cause heartache—er, toothache—in the long run. We got the latest on giving your teeth the TLC they need from two New York City pros: Alice Lee, DDS, an assistant professor in the Department of Dentistry for Montefiore Health System, and Alison Newgard, DDS, an assistant professor of clinical dentistry at Columbia University College of Dentistry, will clue you in on where you could be going wrong.

Multitasking while you brush
 Every minute in the morning feels precious, so it's tempting to brush your teeth in the shower or while scrolling through your Twitter feed. "To each his own," says Dr. Newgard, "but I prefer patients to be in front of a mirror, over the sink; you can be sure to hit all the surfaces of your teeth, and you'll do a more thorough job when you're not distracted." Better to leave the bathroom a few minutes later having given proper attention to each step of your prep.

Overcleaning your toothbrush
 Thinking about running your brush through the dishwasher or zapping it in the microwave to disinfect it? Think again: While we've all seen those stories about toothbrushes harboring gross bacteria, the CDC says there's no evidence that anyone has ever gotten sick from their own toothbrush. Just give your brush a good rinse with regular old tap water, let it air-dry, and store it upright where it's not touching anyone else's brush. More drastic cleaning measures may damage your brush, the CDC notes, which defeats its purpose.

Using social media as your dentist
 The web is full of weird and (seemingly) wonderful DIY dental tips that can hurt much more than they'll help. Read our lips: Don't even go there. "I've heard of patients who go on Pinterest and find ways to whiten their teeth there—by swishing with straight peroxide, for example—which are not good for their teeth," Dr. Newgard says. "Use ADA-approved products that have been tested." (Another online tip to skip: trying to close up a gap in your teeth with DIY rubber band braces.)

Avoiding x-rays
 There have been several recent scares about dental x-rays, including a 2012 study published in the journal Cancer reporting a possible link between dental x-rays and benign brain tumors. However, the American Cancer Society notes that the study does not establish that x-rays actually cause the tumors, and that some people in the study had x-rays years ago, when radiation exposure from dental x-rays was much higher. "X-rays are important because not all conditions can be identified with a visual exam," says Dr. Lee. "For example, there might be cavities between the teeth, or there might be a cyst or other pathology in the jaw." If you're concerned about radiation, talk to your dentist about ways to minimize the number of x-rays you get.


Storing your wet toothbrush in a travel case
 It's important to stow your brush somewhere sanitary before you tuck it into your luggage for a trip—and equally important to set it free once you unpack. "Bacteria thrives in moist environments," says Dr. Lee. "While you should use a cover or case during transport, make sure you take your toothbrush out and allow it to air dry when you reach your destination." No stand-up holder in your hotel room? If you've got a cup for drinking water, that'll do just fine.

Drinking apple cider vinegar
 According to assorted Hollywood celebrities and natural health experts, drinking unfiltered apple-cider vinegar can have near-miraculous effects on your insides. Research doesn't support those claims, but dentists are sure of one thing: The acetic acid in the vinegar is terrible for your tooth enamel. When it comes downing ACV (as proponents call it), Dr. Newgard says, even a good rinse with water afterward might not mitigate the quaff's potential damage: "I just think you shouldn't use it at all." (Our suggestion: Instead of drinking apple cider vinegar straight, try it in a vinaigrette, or use it to soothe sunburn or get chlorine out of your hair.)

Ditching your retainer
 If you once had braces, whether as a teen or as an adult, it's smart to keep wearing your retainer for as long as your orthodontist recommends—which may mean several nights a week, forever. "A patient will have perfect teeth from braces," Dr. Newgard says, "and then they won't wear a retainer at night and their teeth will shift and they'll be unhappy all over again." Honor thy adolescent self, and keep those teeth in line for good. (Got a fixed retainer? Be sure to keep the device clean: "They can be plaque traps," Dr. Newgard says.)

Brushing right after your morning OJ
 Like to start your day with a glass of orange juice—or oh-so-trendy lemon water? Brushing right afterward can wear away your enamel. "The acidic environment weakens the teeth enamel and erosion can occur during this vulnerable period," Dr. Lee says, "so neutralize your mouth first by drinking milk or water, or rinsing with a baking soda solution—or just waiting 30 minutes." The same goes for vomiting, Dr. Lee says, since that's acidic, too. (Gross but true!) If you've thrown up, be sure to rinse before scrubbing out your mouth.

Ignoring your daily (or nightly) grind.
 While mild bruxism—that is, clenching your teeth or grinding your jaw—might not seem like a big deal, severe cases can lead to everything from chipped and worn teeth to headaches, jaw trouble, and even changes in facial appearance. It's hard to know if you grind your teeth at night if a partner doesn't tip you off, of course, but if you experience telltale signs such as jaw soreness or a dull, constant headache, make haste to the dentist; he or she can fit you with a mouth guard to protect you from additional damage.

Smoking
 You already know smoking is bad for your lungs and heart. In case you need another reason to quit smoking: Besides the bad breath and stained teeth, smoking is one of the most significant risk factors associated with the development of gum disease (and the gum recession, bone loss, and tooth loss that come with it), according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Worse yet, smoking can also lower your chances for successful treatment if you've already got gum disease, since nicotine compromises your body's ability to fight infection.

Skipping dentist appointments
 Hate sitting in the dentist's chair? The very best trick for short-circuiting anxiety about going to the dentist is—surprise—going to the dentist. "Most patients who don't like to come in feel that way because when they do, they need a lot of work," Dr. Newgard says. "If you're in every six months for your checkups, you're less likely to run into problems." Moreover, dentists are beginning to employ everything from serene, spa-like settings to animal-assisted therapy (that is, a gentle dog who sits beside you at your appointment) to alleviate patient discomfort; you can find a dental practice in your comfort zone.

Not drinking enough water
 If your part of the country fluoridates its water (find out by visiting the CDC's My Water's Fluoride page), you're in luck: The simple act of sipping tap water can help strengthen your teeth. (Prefer bottled? Some bottled waters have fluoride, and some don't; if it's not listed as an ingredient in the one you favor, Dr. Newgard says, it's extra-important to use toothpaste with fluoride.) Swishing with and drinking water is also an important way to rinse accumulated sugars and acids from your teeth.

Skimping on calcium and vitamin D
 Minerals and vitamins are building blocks for bones and teeth, of course, but they're also key to maintaining their strength and density as we age—and these two are bones' strongest allies. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, adult women need 1,000-1,200 milligrams of calcium and 400-1,000 IU (international units) of vitamin D per day from food, sunlight (for vitamin D) and supplements. Consult your GP on your nutrient needs and be sure your teeth and bones are getting the support they need.

Reaching for the wrong mouth rinse
 There are as many ways to wash that gunk right outta your mouth as there are types of gunk to have in your mouth. "Cosmetic" rinses, for example, will merely control bad breath and leave you with a pleasant taste in your mouth. Therapeutic rinses with ingredients like antimicrobial agents and fluoride, on the other hand, can actually help reduce gingivitis, cavities, plaque, and bad breath. (Fluoride rinses aren't recommended for children under 6, as they might swallow instead of spitting.)

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

If you would like to learn about the services offered by Bohle Family Dentistry, click here.  If you would like to make an appointment call 270.442.0256 or click here.  Please visit our facebook, Google+ and YouTube pages.  #paducahkydentist

By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
September 03, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures

Do You Need A Bridge Or An Implant?We get this question all the time, do I need a bridge or an implant.  The answer is, it depends.

When a person is missing a single tooth, the options to replace it usually come down to either a dental implant or a dental bridge.  Both options will solve the problem of a single missing tooth but which one to use depends mostly on the conditon of your mouth.  If you have a missing tooth and the teeth on each side of the missing one are in great shape with no immediate dental need then an implant is your best bet.  If the the teeth on either side of the missing one have large decay or older large fillings that mean the tooth will likely need a crown soon, then a dental bridge might be your best choice. 

It is really a financial decision.  If you are trying to save some money and the teeth will need a crown, then the bridge solves two problems.  It crowns the teeth that have an issue and it replaces the missing tooth.  The problem is that if the bridge gets a cavity under it, it means replacing it is a three tooth issue.  If you get a dental implant, it can't get a cavity under the crown, which is a great feature. 

You do have the option of getting an implant to replace the missing tooth and also get crowns on the sick teeth but it is more expensive.  Your dental health will dictate which options your choose.

If you would like to learn more about dental implants, click here.  To learn more about crowns, click here.  To make an appointment call 270.442.0256 or click here.  Please visit our Google+, Facebook and YouTube pages.  #paducahkydentist