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By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
November 10, 2015
Tags: Tooth Brushing   hygiene  

Your Mouth May Be Making You Sick!

Is Your Mouth Making You Sick?It is certainly not a secret that the health of your mouth and your overall health are closely related.  Having an unhealthy mouth can contribute to a multitude of problems inluding cancer, diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure.  This is a great graphic that shows what some of those relationships are.  The message here is keep you mouth healthy to avoid other bad health risks.  It seems that regular checkups and cleanings really, really do make a difference.

This graphic is provided by Atlanta Dental Spa and Pintrest at www.atlantadentalspa.com It has a lot of good information.

80% of American adults have some level of gum disease.

If you have diabetes and bleeding gum your risk of premeature death increases as much as 700%!

Gum disease increases the risk of Alzheimers disease, head and neck cancer and both Pancreatic and Kidney cancer.

Peopole with gum disease are more likely to die from heart disase and stroke.

If you are interested in making an appointment at Bohle Family Dentistry, click here.  Please visit our YouTube, facebook and Google+ pages.  #paducahkydentist

 

By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
September 24, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Tooth Brushing   smile   tooth paste  

Molar Man has some superhero tips for you.

Super Hero Molar Man Has Some TipsThat is right gang, Superhero Molarman has some tips about the best way to brush your teeth.  Pick a good toothbrush, good toothpaste and brush regularly.  Also, cut down on the sugary snacks and soda and replace with fruits, vegatables and more healthy water.

Most importantly - don't forget to smile.

If you would like to learn more about all of the great dental services offered at Bohle Family Dentisry; click here.  Please call 270-442-0256 for an appointment or click here.  Visit our Google+, facebook and YouTube pages.  #paducahkydentist.

Graphic by Pinterest and Orthodonist Anchorage.

By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
May 28, 2015
Category: Oral Health

How Can Chocolate Be Good For Your Teeth?

chocolate is good for your teethOk, you have never heard me say this, I want you to eat chocolate!  Now before you go and gulp down a Snickers Bar, let us make sure you understand what I mean.  There have been multiple, recent international studies stating that the bean in chocolate can prevent cavities in animals.  This bean is called the cacao bean husk and its extract is what does the hard work for your preventing cavities.

This cacao bean is the main ingrediant in Dark Chocolate.  That is something completely different than the sugary milk chocolate you probably eat far more of and is in most candies.  That is the bad news.  The good news is that this cavity fighting action might even be stronger than the fluoride we put into the water.   Want to stop tooth decay, just eat some dark chocolate.  It is thought that 3-4 oz of dark chocolate a day could be enough to do the trick.  That would be nice wouldn't it?

It works by making the tooth enamel harder and so less likely to be affected by mouth acids and getting a cavity.  These have been animal trials and will take a few years to work through to human studies but the results are promising.  Maybe one day we will have chocolate flavored toothpaste and mouthrinses that will be good for you.  Too bad we can't add all the sugar that makes it taste super sweet but time will tell.

If you are interested in finding out more about what Bohle Family Dentistry can do for you, click here.  To get an appointment, click here.  Visit our Google+ and YouTube pages.   #paducahkydentist

 

By Dr. Charles Bohle
December 16, 2013
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: Tooth Brushing  

Toothbrushing is such an ingrained habit, few people think twice about it. But as with any habit, you can get sloppy, and that can lead to cavities and gum disease.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 1: Not Using the Right Toothbrush

Consider the size of your mouth when picking a toothbrush, says Richard H. Price, DMD, the consumer advisor for the American Dental Association. "If you are straining to open wide enough to let the brush in, the brush is probably too big," he says.

''The handle has to be comfortable," he says. It should feel as comfortable as holding a fork when you eat.

"The more comfortable it is in your mouth and your hand, then the more likely you will use it and use it properly," he says.

Which is the better toothbrush: Electric or manual?

"It's an individual preference," says Michael Sesemann, DDS, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and an Omaha dentist. "A person who brushes well with a manual will do as well as a person who brushes well with an electric."

Price agrees. "It's not the toothbrush, it's the brusher."

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 2: Not Picking the Right Bristles

Some toothbrushes have angled bristles, others straight. So is one type better? Dentists say no.

''It's more related to technique than the way the bristles come out," says Sesemann.

What is important when buying a toothbrush? Bristles that are too stiff can aggravate the gums. The ADA recommends a soft-bristled brush.

''Bristles should be sturdy enough to remove plaque but not hard enough to damage [the teeth] when used properly," says Price. He doesn't recommend "natural" bristles such as those made from animal hair or boar bristle.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 3: Not Brushing Often Enough or Long Enough

Softly brushing your teeth at least twice a day is recommended. ''Three times a day is best," says Sesemann.

With too much time between brushings, he says, bacterial plaque will build up, boosting the risk of gum inflammation and other problems.

Brushing should last at least two minutes, says Sesemann. Three minutes is even better, says Price.

Most people fall short of both time lines, says Sesemann. "It's an arbitrary number, but it's just so people take the time to clean all the surfaces." He often recommends people divide the mouth into quadrants and spend 30 seconds a quadrant. Some electric toothbrushes include built-in timers.

To make the two minutes go faster, Sesemann says he ''multitasks,'' fitting in a little TV viewing as he brushes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 4: Brushing Too Often or Too Hard

While brushing your teeth three times a day is ideal, more may not be, says Sesemann. "More than four toothbrushings a day would begin to seem compulsive."

Excessive brushing could expose the root of the tooth to irritation, and that could in turn irritate the gums. Brushing vigorously can also erode tooth enamel. The trick is to brush very gently for two to three minutes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5: Not Brushing Correctly

''Long horizontal strokes along the gumline can lead to abrasions," says Sesemann. "Aim your bristles at the gum line at a 45-degree angle and do short strokes or vibrations." Softly brush up and down your teeth, not across your teeth. The strokes should be vertical or circular, not horizontal.

Be sure to brush outer and inner tooth surfaces, the chewing surfaces, and your tongue.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 6: Starting in the Same Place Each Time

Many people start brushing the same part of their mouth over and over, dentists find.

"Start in a different place so that you don't get lazy in the same area of your mouth," says Price. He reasons that by the time you get to the last quadrant of your mouth, you're bored with brushing.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 7: Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces

Most people forget to brush the inner surfaces of teeth -- the surface that your tongue presses against.

"The plaque you can't see is just as important to remove as the plaque you can see," says Price.

The most commonly skipped area, dentists say, is the inner surface of the lower front teeth.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 8: Not Following Up With a Rinse

Bacteria can grow on an un-rinsed toothbrush. Then, the next time you brush your teeth, you may actually put old bacteria back in your mouth, says Laurence Rifkin, DDS, a dentist in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rinsing the toothbrush after you brush will help remove any leftover toothpaste, too.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 9: Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry

"If you have a toothbrush that's perpetually moist, it will cultivate more bacteria," says Sesemann.

"If the bristles stay soggy, you can misshape them as you use the brush," Price says. "Or it might be a breeding ground for bacteria."

It's a good idea to shake out the moisture, then recap it with a cap that allows air in, he says.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 10: Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough

The American Dental Association recommends getting a new brush every three or four months, or even sooner if the bristles look frayed.

But rather than go by a strict timeline, Price says a visual inspection of the bristles is better. "Once the bristles lose their normal flexibility and start to break apart, change your toothbrush," he says.

"Look more at the state of the bristles than the time period," he says.

Some brushes have colored indicators that alert you when they need replacing, says Price. 

 





Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5: Not Brushing Correctly

''Long horizontal strokes along the gumline can lead to abrasions," says Sesemann. "Aim your bristles at the gum line at a 45-degree angle and do short strokes or vibrations." Softly brush up and down your teeth, not across your teeth. The strokes should be vertical or circular, not horizontal.

Be sure to brush outer and inner tooth surfaces, the chewing surfaces, and your tongue.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 6: Starting in the Same Place Each Time

Many people start brushing the same part of their mouth over and over, dentists find.

"Start in a different place so that you don't get lazy in the same area of your mouth," says Price. He reasons that by the time you get to the last quadrant of your mouth, you're bored with brushing.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 7: Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces

Most people forget to brush the inner surfaces of teeth -- the surface that your tongue presses against.

"The plaque you can't see is just as important to remove as the plaque you can see," says Price.

The most commonly skipped area, dentists say, is the inner surface of the lower front teeth.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 8: Not Following Up With a Rinse

Bacteria can grow on an un-rinsed toothbrush. Then, the next time you brush your teeth, you may actually put old bacteria back in your mouth, says Laurence Rifkin, DDS, a dentist in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rinsing the toothbrush after you brush will help remove any leftover toothpaste, too.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 9: Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry

"If you have a toothbrush that's perpetually moist, it will cultivate more bacteria," says Sesemann.

"If the bristles stay soggy, you can misshape them as you use the brush," Price says. "Or it might be a breeding ground for bacteria."

It's a good idea to shake out the moisture, then recap it with a cap that allows air in, he says.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 10: Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough

The American Dental Association recommends getting a new brush every three or four months, or even sooner if the bristles look frayed.

But rather than go by a strict timeline, Price says a visual inspection of the bristles is better. "Once the bristles lose their normal flexibility and start to break apart, change your toothbrush," he says.

"Look more at the state of the bristles than the time period," he says.

Some brushes have colored indicators that alert you when they need replacing, says Price.