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Posts for: October, 2015

By Bohle Family Dentistry
October 22, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: wisdom teeth  
RemovingWisdomTeethnowmayPreventDentalProblemsLater

Teeth damaged by decay, periodontal (gum) disease or trauma are often removed (extracted) if they’re deemed beyond repair. But there’s another reason we may recommend an extraction: a tooth is causing or has the potential to cause problems for other teeth and your overall oral health.

Some of the most frequent cases of “preventive extraction” involve the third molars, or wisdom teeth, located in the very back of the mouth. They’re usually the last permanent teeth to come in, which is related to some of the problems they can cause. Because they’re trying to come in among teeth that have already erupted they don’t always erupt properly, often at abnormal angles or not fully erupting through the gums, a condition called impaction.

Impacted or misaligned wisdom teeth can put pressure on adjacent teeth and their roots, which can cause root resorption that damages the second molar. They can also increase the risk of periodontal (gum) disease in the gum tissues of the second molars, which if untreated can ultimately cause teeth and bone loss.

Because of current or possible future problems with wisdom teeth, we often consider removing them at some early point in the person’s dental development. Such a consideration shouldn’t be undertaken lightly, since wisdom teeth extraction is often complex and fraught with complications, and it usually requires a surgical procedure.

That’s why we first conduct a comprehensive examination (including x-ray or other imaging to determine exact location and possible complications) before we recommend an extraction. If after careful analysis an extraction appears to be the best course, we must then consider other factors like planned orthodontics to determine the best time for the procedure.

Once performed, a wisdom tooth extraction can resolve existing problems now and reduce the risks of gum disease or malocclusions in the future. When it comes to wisdom teeth, removing them may be in your or your family member’s best interest for optimal dental health.

If you would like more information on wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.”


By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
October 13, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: brushing   candy   Halloween  

Here Are Some Great Halloween Fun Facts

Halloween Fun FactsSTOP ZOBIE MOUTH!

Would you believe that Halloween is a 6 Billion dollar business.  What account for cards, decorations, candy and costumes, it all adds up.  Also, the average American eats 24 pounds of candy a year.  That is a lot of sugar.

I guess it is a no brainer that chocolate is the most popular candy for adults but it is for children also.

The tradition of carving out large sized plants started in Ireland with rutabagas and turnips.

It is important to be safe and also eat your Halloween candy the correct way.  Let your kids have some candy but limited how often they get it.  If you munch a piece or two all day then the chances of getting a cavity are much higher than only eating it once a day.  Even if you eat more in your one sitting.

So dress up, have fun and be safe.  Brush well before you go to bed.

You can get an appointment at Bohle Family Dentistry by clicking here or calling 270-442-0256.  You can learn more about our services.  Please visit our Google+, YouTube and facebook pages.  #paducahkydentist


By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Familly Dentisry
October 07, 2015
Category: Oral Health

Here are 5 reasons to wear a mouthguard!

5 Reasons To Wear A MouthguardI personallly wear a mouthguard everynight as a way of protecting my teeth from grinding and to give my jaw muscles a rest.  If you ever wake up with headaches, give a mouthguard a try.  I don't feel comfortable without it.

This infographic provided by DentAbout.com and Pintrest discuss ways a mouthguard helps protect you from sports injuries.

  1. 1. Helps reduce chance of concussion
  2. 2. Protects jaw joints against injury
  3. 3. Protects soft tissues from injury
  4. 4. Cushions teeth against impact
  5. 5. Helps prevent injuries to the jaws and neck

You should play no sport where a collsion is possible and not wear protection for your teeth.  I have repaired far too many mouths that have been injuried because no mouthguard was warn.  Please do yourself a favor and protect your teeth from harm.

Learn about the services at Bohle Dental or call 270-442-0256 for an appointment.  Visit our YouTube, facebook and Google+ pages.  #paducahkydentist

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By Bohle Family Dentistry
October 07, 2015
Category: Oral Health
SofiaVergaraObsessedWithOralHygiene

A woman as gorgeous and funny as Sofia Vergara surely planned to be a model and actress from the get-go, right? Wrong! Sofia’s first career choice actually was to be… a dentist! That’s right, the sexy star of TV’s Modern Family actually was only two semesters shy of finishing a dental degree in her native Columbia when she traded dental school for the small screen. Still, dental health remains a top priority for the actress and her son, Manolo.

“I’m obsessed,” she recently told People magazine. “My son thinks I’m crazy because I make him do a cleaning every three months. I try to bribe the dentist to make him to do it sooner!”

That’s what we call a healthy obsession (teeth-cleaning, not bribery). And while coming in for a professional cleaning every three months may not be necessary for everyone, some people — especially those who are particularly susceptible to gum disease — may benefit from professional cleanings on a three-month schedule. In fact, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to having professional teeth cleanings — but everyone needs this beneficial procedure on a regular basis.

Even if you are meticulous about your daily oral hygiene routine at home, there are plenty of reasons for regular checkups. They include:

  • Dental exam. Oral health problems such as tooth decay and gum disease are much easier — and less expensive — to treat in the earliest stages. You may not have symptoms of either disease early on, but we can spot the warning signs and take appropriate preventive or restorative measures.
  • Oral cancer screening. Oral cancer is not just a concern of the middle aged and elderly — young adults can be affected as well (even those who do not smoke). The survival rate for this deadly disease goes up tremendously if it is detected quickly, and an oral cancer screening is part of every routine dental visit.
  • Professional teeth cleaning. Calcified (hardened) dental plaque (tartar or calculus) can build up near the gum line over time — even if you brush and floss every day. These deposits can irritate your gums and create favorable conditions for tooth decay. You can’t remove tartar by flossing or brushing, but we can clear it away — and leave you with a bright, fresh-feeling smile!

So take a tip from Sofia Vergara, and don’t skimp on professional cleanings and checkups. If you want to know how often you should come in for routine dental checkups, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor articles “Dental Hygiene Visit” and “Dental Cleanings Using Ultrasonic Scalers.”


By Dr. Charles Bohle & Bohle Family Dentistry
October 06, 2015
Category: Oral Health

I ran across this article on Fox News by Lauren Oster and thought it would be a good one to pass along.  See the original article here.  You may or may not have heard of some things on this list but put together all in one place is a good idea.  I was guilty of the first one, multitasking.  You will end up with a cleaner mouth if you concentrate on what you are doing instead of planning your day.

14 mistakes you are making with your teeth

 

 

 

 

Taking care of your pearly whites isn't rocket science, but it's easy to slip into habits that could cause heartache—er, toothache—in the long run. We got the latest on giving your teeth the TLC they need from two New York City pros: Alice Lee, DDS, an assistant professor in the Department of Dentistry for Montefiore Health System, and Alison Newgard, DDS, an assistant professor of clinical dentistry at Columbia University College of Dentistry, will clue you in on where you could be going wrong.

Multitasking while you brush
 Every minute in the morning feels precious, so it's tempting to brush your teeth in the shower or while scrolling through your Twitter feed. "To each his own," says Dr. Newgard, "but I prefer patients to be in front of a mirror, over the sink; you can be sure to hit all the surfaces of your teeth, and you'll do a more thorough job when you're not distracted." Better to leave the bathroom a few minutes later having given proper attention to each step of your prep.

Overcleaning your toothbrush
 Thinking about running your brush through the dishwasher or zapping it in the microwave to disinfect it? Think again: While we've all seen those stories about toothbrushes harboring gross bacteria, the CDC says there's no evidence that anyone has ever gotten sick from their own toothbrush. Just give your brush a good rinse with regular old tap water, let it air-dry, and store it upright where it's not touching anyone else's brush. More drastic cleaning measures may damage your brush, the CDC notes, which defeats its purpose.

Using social media as your dentist
 The web is full of weird and (seemingly) wonderful DIY dental tips that can hurt much more than they'll help. Read our lips: Don't even go there. "I've heard of patients who go on Pinterest and find ways to whiten their teeth there—by swishing with straight peroxide, for example—which are not good for their teeth," Dr. Newgard says. "Use ADA-approved products that have been tested." (Another online tip to skip: trying to close up a gap in your teeth with DIY rubber band braces.)

Avoiding x-rays
 There have been several recent scares about dental x-rays, including a 2012 study published in the journal Cancer reporting a possible link between dental x-rays and benign brain tumors. However, the American Cancer Society notes that the study does not establish that x-rays actually cause the tumors, and that some people in the study had x-rays years ago, when radiation exposure from dental x-rays was much higher. "X-rays are important because not all conditions can be identified with a visual exam," says Dr. Lee. "For example, there might be cavities between the teeth, or there might be a cyst or other pathology in the jaw." If you're concerned about radiation, talk to your dentist about ways to minimize the number of x-rays you get.


Storing your wet toothbrush in a travel case
 It's important to stow your brush somewhere sanitary before you tuck it into your luggage for a trip—and equally important to set it free once you unpack. "Bacteria thrives in moist environments," says Dr. Lee. "While you should use a cover or case during transport, make sure you take your toothbrush out and allow it to air dry when you reach your destination." No stand-up holder in your hotel room? If you've got a cup for drinking water, that'll do just fine.

Drinking apple cider vinegar
 According to assorted Hollywood celebrities and natural health experts, drinking unfiltered apple-cider vinegar can have near-miraculous effects on your insides. Research doesn't support those claims, but dentists are sure of one thing: The acetic acid in the vinegar is terrible for your tooth enamel. When it comes downing ACV (as proponents call it), Dr. Newgard says, even a good rinse with water afterward might not mitigate the quaff's potential damage: "I just think you shouldn't use it at all." (Our suggestion: Instead of drinking apple cider vinegar straight, try it in a vinaigrette, or use it to soothe sunburn or get chlorine out of your hair.)

Ditching your retainer
 If you once had braces, whether as a teen or as an adult, it's smart to keep wearing your retainer for as long as your orthodontist recommends—which may mean several nights a week, forever. "A patient will have perfect teeth from braces," Dr. Newgard says, "and then they won't wear a retainer at night and their teeth will shift and they'll be unhappy all over again." Honor thy adolescent self, and keep those teeth in line for good. (Got a fixed retainer? Be sure to keep the device clean: "They can be plaque traps," Dr. Newgard says.)

Brushing right after your morning OJ
 Like to start your day with a glass of orange juice—or oh-so-trendy lemon water? Brushing right afterward can wear away your enamel. "The acidic environment weakens the teeth enamel and erosion can occur during this vulnerable period," Dr. Lee says, "so neutralize your mouth first by drinking milk or water, or rinsing with a baking soda solution—or just waiting 30 minutes." The same goes for vomiting, Dr. Lee says, since that's acidic, too. (Gross but true!) If you've thrown up, be sure to rinse before scrubbing out your mouth.

Ignoring your daily (or nightly) grind.
 While mild bruxism—that is, clenching your teeth or grinding your jaw—might not seem like a big deal, severe cases can lead to everything from chipped and worn teeth to headaches, jaw trouble, and even changes in facial appearance. It's hard to know if you grind your teeth at night if a partner doesn't tip you off, of course, but if you experience telltale signs such as jaw soreness or a dull, constant headache, make haste to the dentist; he or she can fit you with a mouth guard to protect you from additional damage.

Smoking
 You already know smoking is bad for your lungs and heart. In case you need another reason to quit smoking: Besides the bad breath and stained teeth, smoking is one of the most significant risk factors associated with the development of gum disease (and the gum recession, bone loss, and tooth loss that come with it), according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Worse yet, smoking can also lower your chances for successful treatment if you've already got gum disease, since nicotine compromises your body's ability to fight infection.

Skipping dentist appointments
 Hate sitting in the dentist's chair? The very best trick for short-circuiting anxiety about going to the dentist is—surprise—going to the dentist. "Most patients who don't like to come in feel that way because when they do, they need a lot of work," Dr. Newgard says. "If you're in every six months for your checkups, you're less likely to run into problems." Moreover, dentists are beginning to employ everything from serene, spa-like settings to animal-assisted therapy (that is, a gentle dog who sits beside you at your appointment) to alleviate patient discomfort; you can find a dental practice in your comfort zone.

Not drinking enough water
 If your part of the country fluoridates its water (find out by visiting the CDC's My Water's Fluoride page), you're in luck: The simple act of sipping tap water can help strengthen your teeth. (Prefer bottled? Some bottled waters have fluoride, and some don't; if it's not listed as an ingredient in the one you favor, Dr. Newgard says, it's extra-important to use toothpaste with fluoride.) Swishing with and drinking water is also an important way to rinse accumulated sugars and acids from your teeth.

Skimping on calcium and vitamin D
 Minerals and vitamins are building blocks for bones and teeth, of course, but they're also key to maintaining their strength and density as we age—and these two are bones' strongest allies. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, adult women need 1,000-1,200 milligrams of calcium and 400-1,000 IU (international units) of vitamin D per day from food, sunlight (for vitamin D) and supplements. Consult your GP on your nutrient needs and be sure your teeth and bones are getting the support they need.

Reaching for the wrong mouth rinse
 There are as many ways to wash that gunk right outta your mouth as there are types of gunk to have in your mouth. "Cosmetic" rinses, for example, will merely control bad breath and leave you with a pleasant taste in your mouth. Therapeutic rinses with ingredients like antimicrobial agents and fluoride, on the other hand, can actually help reduce gingivitis, cavities, plaque, and bad breath. (Fluoride rinses aren't recommended for children under 6, as they might swallow instead of spitting.)

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

If you would like to learn about the services offered by Bohle Family Dentistry, click here.  If you would like to make an appointment call 270.442.0256 or click here.  Please visit our facebook, Google+ and YouTube pages.  #paducahkydentist