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Posts for: December, 2013

By Dr. Charles Bohle, Bohle Family Dentistry
December 30, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crown  
ConsideralltheCostFactorsWhenDecidingonaCrownRestoration

A crown restoration is a fabricated replica of a natural tooth. The mechanics and methods to prepare the tooth and attach the new crown are standard procedures in dentistry. But the crowns themselves — their individual shape, color and material from which they’re constructed — can differ greatly depending on each patient’s individual needs and desires. All these factors can have a bearing on cost — not to mention the process a dentist may employ to produce a custom crown.

Crowns are usually fashioned by a dental laboratory technician using castings of the patient’s mouth prepared by the dentist. These professionals should be considered artists as well as scientists. And, like artists with certain areas of strength and expertise, individual technicians may also develop high practical skill for a particular type of tooth replacement; it’s not uncommon for a dentist to use a different dental technician for a particular type and size of tooth to be restored. This could prove to be a factor in the final cost.

The efforts to create the best color in the crown can also affect cost. While we think of teeth as uniformly “pearly white,” there really are variations and gradations in normal tooth color (even within the same tooth). Again, a bit of artistry is important here, as the dentist communicates with the technician on not only the color but also the subtle hue gradations along the length of the crown. Your input as a patient is also valuable in determining color — you must be satisfied with the final product. Fortunately, it’s now possible to take a “test drive” of your potentially new look with a provisional crown that will allow you to see just how your permanent crown (which will be made of longer-lasting, higher quality materials) will appear.

These factors, as well as the limitations you may face by your insurance coverage, can greatly influence the final cost of treatment. As your dentist, we will consult and work with you to find the best crown restoration option that will fit both your dental needs and your financial ability.

If you would like more information on your options for crowns and other restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Value of Quality Care.”


By Charles Bohle, Bohle Family Dentistry
December 27, 2013
Category: Oral Health
ChristieBrinkleysAll-AmericanSmile

Model Christie Brinkley's smile has been a symbol of America's optimism since the seventies. Particularly well known for being the cover model for three consecutive Sports Illustrated Swimsuit editions, Brinkley still has a fresh-faced American girl-next-door beauty that starts with her cheerful smile, which transmits the message that all is well.

Brinkley's modeling career began when she was “discovered” in Paris in the seventies, at the age of 18. As she explained in an interview with Dear Doctor magazine, it was like a fairy tale. She had gone to study art in Paris, where a fashion designer spotted her walking down the street. “He told me later he immediately thought, ‘That's the girl!’” she said.

Brinkley attributes her famous smile to a combination of good genetics (she inherited her mother's “beautiful straight teeth”), combined with the intelligence to practice good oral hygiene and have regular dental appointments. She never needed to have work done to prepare her for the modeling life; but as a teenager, she said, she wished she could wear braces because she thought the “coolest kids had them.”

Although dental restorations were not needed to enhance her beautiful natural smile, she did have two dental implants after she fractured two rear molars in a bad helicopter crash while back-country skiing, and she says she is thankful for dental implant technology because it looks and feels so natural.

Brinkley said that her smile led directly to her assignment as spokesperson for a brand of oral rinse and mouthwash products. She is also concerned about the environment. Her company Christie, Inc. is designing environmentally friendly products.

Her advice to everyone is to smile more. “I think a smile makes EVERYONE beautiful! It's the greatest gift we give each other... It's an expression of friendship, love and peace!”

If you have questions about your smile, contact us today to schedule an appointment. Or you can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Christie Brinkley's Supermodel Smile.”


By Dr. Charles Bohle
December 16, 2013
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: Tooth Brushing  

Toothbrushing is such an ingrained habit, few people think twice about it. But as with any habit, you can get sloppy, and that can lead to cavities and gum disease.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 1: Not Using the Right Toothbrush

Consider the size of your mouth when picking a toothbrush, says Richard H. Price, DMD, the consumer advisor for the American Dental Association. "If you are straining to open wide enough to let the brush in, the brush is probably too big," he says.

''The handle has to be comfortable," he says. It should feel as comfortable as holding a fork when you eat.

"The more comfortable it is in your mouth and your hand, then the more likely you will use it and use it properly," he says.

Which is the better toothbrush: Electric or manual?

"It's an individual preference," says Michael Sesemann, DDS, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and an Omaha dentist. "A person who brushes well with a manual will do as well as a person who brushes well with an electric."

Price agrees. "It's not the toothbrush, it's the brusher."

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 2: Not Picking the Right Bristles

Some toothbrushes have angled bristles, others straight. So is one type better? Dentists say no.

''It's more related to technique than the way the bristles come out," says Sesemann.

What is important when buying a toothbrush? Bristles that are too stiff can aggravate the gums. The ADA recommends a soft-bristled brush.

''Bristles should be sturdy enough to remove plaque but not hard enough to damage [the teeth] when used properly," says Price. He doesn't recommend "natural" bristles such as those made from animal hair or boar bristle.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 3: Not Brushing Often Enough or Long Enough

Softly brushing your teeth at least twice a day is recommended. ''Three times a day is best," says Sesemann.

With too much time between brushings, he says, bacterial plaque will build up, boosting the risk of gum inflammation and other problems.

Brushing should last at least two minutes, says Sesemann. Three minutes is even better, says Price.

Most people fall short of both time lines, says Sesemann. "It's an arbitrary number, but it's just so people take the time to clean all the surfaces." He often recommends people divide the mouth into quadrants and spend 30 seconds a quadrant. Some electric toothbrushes include built-in timers.

To make the two minutes go faster, Sesemann says he ''multitasks,'' fitting in a little TV viewing as he brushes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 4: Brushing Too Often or Too Hard

While brushing your teeth three times a day is ideal, more may not be, says Sesemann. "More than four toothbrushings a day would begin to seem compulsive."

Excessive brushing could expose the root of the tooth to irritation, and that could in turn irritate the gums. Brushing vigorously can also erode tooth enamel. The trick is to brush very gently for two to three minutes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5: Not Brushing Correctly

''Long horizontal strokes along the gumline can lead to abrasions," says Sesemann. "Aim your bristles at the gum line at a 45-degree angle and do short strokes or vibrations." Softly brush up and down your teeth, not across your teeth. The strokes should be vertical or circular, not horizontal.

Be sure to brush outer and inner tooth surfaces, the chewing surfaces, and your tongue.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 6: Starting in the Same Place Each Time

Many people start brushing the same part of their mouth over and over, dentists find.

"Start in a different place so that you don't get lazy in the same area of your mouth," says Price. He reasons that by the time you get to the last quadrant of your mouth, you're bored with brushing.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 7: Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces

Most people forget to brush the inner surfaces of teeth -- the surface that your tongue presses against.

"The plaque you can't see is just as important to remove as the plaque you can see," says Price.

The most commonly skipped area, dentists say, is the inner surface of the lower front teeth.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 8: Not Following Up With a Rinse

Bacteria can grow on an un-rinsed toothbrush. Then, the next time you brush your teeth, you may actually put old bacteria back in your mouth, says Laurence Rifkin, DDS, a dentist in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rinsing the toothbrush after you brush will help remove any leftover toothpaste, too.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 9: Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry

"If you have a toothbrush that's perpetually moist, it will cultivate more bacteria," says Sesemann.

"If the bristles stay soggy, you can misshape them as you use the brush," Price says. "Or it might be a breeding ground for bacteria."

It's a good idea to shake out the moisture, then recap it with a cap that allows air in, he says.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 10: Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough

The American Dental Association recommends getting a new brush every three or four months, or even sooner if the bristles look frayed.

But rather than go by a strict timeline, Price says a visual inspection of the bristles is better. "Once the bristles lose their normal flexibility and start to break apart, change your toothbrush," he says.

"Look more at the state of the bristles than the time period," he says.

Some brushes have colored indicators that alert you when they need replacing, says Price. 

 





Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5: Not Brushing Correctly

''Long horizontal strokes along the gumline can lead to abrasions," says Sesemann. "Aim your bristles at the gum line at a 45-degree angle and do short strokes or vibrations." Softly brush up and down your teeth, not across your teeth. The strokes should be vertical or circular, not horizontal.

Be sure to brush outer and inner tooth surfaces, the chewing surfaces, and your tongue.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 6: Starting in the Same Place Each Time

Many people start brushing the same part of their mouth over and over, dentists find.

"Start in a different place so that you don't get lazy in the same area of your mouth," says Price. He reasons that by the time you get to the last quadrant of your mouth, you're bored with brushing.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 7: Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces

Most people forget to brush the inner surfaces of teeth -- the surface that your tongue presses against.

"The plaque you can't see is just as important to remove as the plaque you can see," says Price.

The most commonly skipped area, dentists say, is the inner surface of the lower front teeth.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 8: Not Following Up With a Rinse

Bacteria can grow on an un-rinsed toothbrush. Then, the next time you brush your teeth, you may actually put old bacteria back in your mouth, says Laurence Rifkin, DDS, a dentist in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rinsing the toothbrush after you brush will help remove any leftover toothpaste, too.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 9: Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry

"If you have a toothbrush that's perpetually moist, it will cultivate more bacteria," says Sesemann.

"If the bristles stay soggy, you can misshape them as you use the brush," Price says. "Or it might be a breeding ground for bacteria."

It's a good idea to shake out the moisture, then recap it with a cap that allows air in, he says.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 10: Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough

The American Dental Association recommends getting a new brush every three or four months, or even sooner if the bristles look frayed.

But rather than go by a strict timeline, Price says a visual inspection of the bristles is better. "Once the bristles lose their normal flexibility and start to break apart, change your toothbrush," he says.

"Look more at the state of the bristles than the time period," he says.

Some brushes have colored indicators that alert you when they need replacing, says Price. 

 


By Dr. Charles Bohle, Bohle Family Dentistry
December 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TakingtheStressOutofChildhoodDentalVisits

Dentists have been saying for years that it helps to see children as early as possible — ideally, around the time they reach one year old. Just recently, an evidence-based study was released that backs this up: It shows that starting dental visits prior to age one actually reduces the cost of oral health care, and helps ensure that kids have pleasant dental experiences in the future.

Why do young children need to go to the dentist if they only have one or two teeth (and they’re baby teeth, to boot)? For one thing, those early dental visits get a child used to the new sights and sounds of the office: the big chair, the shiny equipment, and the friendly staff who will be taking care of them. And even at this tender age, it’s not too soon to check for signs of decay, make sure gums are healthy, and show everyone the best techniques for keeping up good oral hygiene in a growing mouth.

Still, it’s natural for a child to be a little nervous before an office visit. (Even grown-ups have been known to show some anxiety at the dental office from time to time.) To ease their way through, there are several techniques you can borrow from behavioral psychology to help make the experience as stress-free as possible.

First… just relax. Remember that kids quickly pick up on non-verbal cues that tell them something’s wrong — so try and stay positive, and keep smiling. You should prepare the little ones for what’s coming — but not too much information, please! We go to great efforts to make children feel safe and comfortable in our care, and we can tell them all they need to know in age-appropriate terms. In fact, most of your child’s first dental visit may consist of a show-and-tell about what we do and what tools we use.

Another thing to keep in mind is that parents are the major role models for their children, both in and out of the home. Kids naturally follow along — in both good and bad ways. If parents take good care of their own teeth, it helps kids develop good oral hygiene habits too. That includes brushing and flossing regularly, limiting sugary snacks between meals, and avoiding non-nutritious drinks — not only sodas, but also so-called “sports” and “energy” drinks, which can be extremely high in sugar and caffeine.

Of course, regular visits to the dentist should also be a part of every adult’s oral hygiene program. If your child sees you relaxing in the chair, it’s much easier for them to do it too. And that’s good for everybody’s health.

If you would like more information about children’s dental visits, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids.”